10 Warthog Symbolism Facts & Meaning: A Totem, Spirit & Power Animal

If you grew up in the 90s, you would instinctively know what a Warthog is, thanks to Pumbaa. But how much do you know about these amazing animals?

Warthogs are of the same family as the pig that we know. However, they have a different appearance — they have flat heads, sparse hair, and their bodies are covered with wart-like growths (hence their name). While Warthogs look scary, they are mostly peaceful grazers that use their snouts for digging roots.

When things get hairy for them, however, they can be pretty fierce. They can run at speeds of 30 miles an hour, which is much faster than the average person. Their tusks can be used as offensive weapons, and can be pretty devastating on one of their charges.

Warthog Symbolism Facts & Meaning: A Totem, Spirit & Power Animal

Warthogs are well-suited to the African environment they are commonly found in, capable of going for very long periods without water — up to several months, in fact. When water is widely available, Warthogs not only use it for sustenance but also to cool down.

Because of the high adaptability of Warthogs, they are among the best spirit animals for the person who needs to push the bounds of comfort in order to make progress.

The Warthog in the watering hole is the image of a person trying to get clarity, in order to make sense of the predicaments around him. The fierce run of a Warthog reflects that same person facing his fears and personal problems.

I
Warthog Symbolism & Meaning

The Warthog has been seen to be a symbol of alertness and vigilance. While “vigilance” has a pretty warlike connotation, this isn’t always the case. We have already established that the Warthog is a peaceful creature, but that does not mean it is not always on the lookout for danger. In fact, the Warthog has an uncanny ability to sense when something is not right.

Being vigilant means being sensitive about the changes that happen around you, whether good or bad. A Warthog knows when it should run and when it should fight, when it can find water and when it should endure the parched heat. In real life, we are taught to know when to find opportunities and when to evade incoming troubles.

II
Warthog Spirit Animal

As a spirit animal, the Warthog is portrayed as a seeker of the truth. Many members of the pig family are adept at sniffing out items, and the Warthog is no exception. A person granted the power of this Spirit Animal has the ability to sniff out the truth from any situation, cutting to the core of things. It is very hard to fool a Warthog person, and even when you think you can, it is very ill-advised as such people know how to defend themselves!

III
Warthog Power Animal

Another thing the Warthog excels in is its ability to convert weakness to strength. True to its remarkable adaptability, the Warthog can turn things that would otherwise debilitate other people into something that can lead it to advantage. Fear is a common example. Living in the harsh African ecosystem means there are many predators lurking around for the unsuspecting Warthog. But instead of letting fear be a paralyzing factor, the Warthog taps into it to make it more cautious, therefore avoiding trouble before it even strikes. The Warthog can lend this power to us in real life, allowing us to tap into fear but makes us stronger — something that may seem to others very paradoxical.

IV
Warthog Totem Animal

The person born under the Warthog totem is an inborn warrior, but it is very hard to see them as one. In fact, the Warthog person is often very unassuming, preferring to do his tasks under the radar. That is, until something goes wrong and he takes the lead in uncovering it.

The Warthog person is also the natural spearhead for new projects and endeavors, given how comfortable he seems in traversing new territory. The Warthog loves challenges, and slowly yet steadily works until the challenge is unravelled.

V
Warthog Native American Symbolism

The Warthog does not appear in the North American stories, since they did not exist where the Native Americans lived. However, the head of a wild pig represents the strength of the hunter.

VI
Warthog Celtic Symbolism

Since Warthogs are native to the sub-Saharan regions of Africa, the Celts did not have any interaction with them. Hence, they did not appear in any of the Celtic stories. The wild boar, on the other hand, symbolizes a warrior’s valor and ferocious strength.

VII
Warthog Far Eastern Symbolism

Likewise, the Far East did not have any records of the Warthog. Hence, it was not part of the expansive pantheon of symbolic animals in this region. Despite this, a pivotal symbol of sustenance and wealth as depicted in Chinese art is the boar.

VIII
Warthog in Dreams

When the Warthog appears in your dreams, it means you might be missing out on something going on around you. Maybe there is someone ill-intentioned among your circle, or maybe there is an opportunity that has presented itself that you’re not aware of. It is time to snoop around a bit and sniff out your surroundings!

IX
Warthog Encounters / Warthog Omens

The Warthog also appears to those who may be feeling bored at their current status and track in life. When you see a Warthog, deep inside you may be looking for some challenges — perhaps it is time to change course a bit and go for something completely new!

X
Warthog Mythology and Folklore

There is a legend that exists narrating why the Warthog looks as it does right now. The legend states that the Warthog used to be a very handsome animal, which has resulted to it becoming vain. Vain enough that it once showed off to a lion, who did not take kindly to the haughtiness having the lion to chase the Warthog back to its hole. Before this encounter, however, the Warthog had invited a fellow porcupine to rest after a night’s hard work scavenging for food. The porcupine was not sleeping tightly in the Warthog’s burrow for being oblivious of the master of the house who was now being chased as potential food.

The Warthog suddenly dived into his hole, and thought he was safe already. Forgetting the porcupine, the Warthog was unable to slow down before the quills of his friend hit him around the face and across the body. The Warthog shrieked in pain, and until now we can still see the prick marks that turned into the “warts” on its skin. To prevent the same thing from happening again, the Warthog lessened its air of superiority, relegating itself to the position of a perpetual observer.

Perhaps now we can learn a thing or two from this Warthog misadventure!


To view personal experiences and interesting encounters from other readers, please submit your own in the form below. Otherwise, login to your account.
Submit Your Story

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Share
Tweet
Pin